23 March 2011

Ban on Displaying a Dead or Mutilated Body

I'm very interested to see what kind of comments are left on LifeSiteNews' story, Law banning ‘sex-change’ surgery proposed in Lithuania. The story itself is interesting, but what really caught my attention was this additional information:
Lithuania is leading Europe in implementing legislation that protects the family, natural marriage, and the country’s children from the more detrimental effects of the sexual revolution.

In 2009, the Seimas [Lithuania’s parliament] passed the Law on the Protection of Minors Against the Detrimental Effect of Public Information, which went into effect in March of 2010.

That law prohibits the dissemination, in a public forum accessible to youth under 18 years, of information recognized to have a negative effect on the mental, intellectual, and moral development of youth. Specifically, it measure bans “the portrayal of physical or psychological violence, displaying a dead or mutilated body, [and] information that arouses fear or horror or that encourages self abuse or suicide,” and forbids individuals and organizations from “encouraging the sexual abuse of minors, sexual relations between minors and other sexual relations.”

It also prohibits the spreading of information that “denigrates family values” or “encourages a concept of marriage and family other than stipulated in the Constitution and the Civil Code of the Republic of Lithuania.”

Since Lithuania’s civil law defines marriage as the union of a man and a woman, this legislation also proscribes campaigning for same-sex “marriage” in public places accessible to youth.

This is all very encouraging from my ancestral homeland of Lithuania, but if it were enacted here in Canada, it would affect some pro-life demonstrators. A law that prohibits the displaying, in a public forum accessible to youth under 18 years, of a dead or mutilated body would mean that pro-life demonstrators would not be allowed to publicly display graphic images of aborted babies.

This Lithuanian law makes a lot of sense and I would love to have a similar law in Canada, as I'm sure many Christians would agree. However, would the same people that sent negative e-mails to the Alberta bishops over their boycott of this year's March for Life approve of such a good law? The Alberta bishops boycotted the March for Life for the very reason Lithuania enacted this law: "the Protection of Minors Against the Detrimental Effect of Public Information."

I know the Alberta bishops received a lot of negative e-mails over their boycott of this year's March for Life because Bishop Fred Henry told me, in a reply to my e-mail, that my e-mail was "one of the few positive ones that [he] received."